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Forecasts for USA (90 Days August-October 2013)

Back to work!

It’s good to be back and posting again. I’m sorry my friends for going M.I.A for a while, but life can be funny that way. Now back, better than ever our page will be updated constantly and the formatting will change too :). 

P.S. Check out Ascel Bio’s sample video for USA 90 Infectious Disease Forecasts for 2013. 

Cheers, A. 

nprglobalhealth:

How Midwives Have Become Critical In War Zones
In a conflict zone, getting the basics — food, water, shelter — is a constant challenge. And it likely involves being on the move.
Now imagine pregnancy. There might not be a functioning medical facility for miles. And the environment makes the woman and her baby more susceptible to complications.
Aid groups are increasingly relying on conflict midwives to help women in these situations. In dangerous and unstable regions, midwives’ jobs are more than delivering babies: They often have to help women who have experienced sexual violence and have reproductive health issues.
Take Emily Slocum, a midwife with Doctors Without Borders who worked with women affected by the violent conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Some women traveled days to reach her.
The Congo war lasted from 1998 to 2004, but as NPR’s John Burnett has reported, ongoing conflict continues to disrupt daily life. The country has millions of displaced people.
Slocum worked at a hospital in South Kivu, where the conflict still lingers, from November 2011 to May 2012. She tells Shots that one of the challenges was keeping underweight newborns warm. Without an incubator, the best practice is to have the mother hold the baby to her skinto keep its body temperature up, she says. She had to teach nurses and mothers to do that when she arrived
Continue reading.
Photograph by Jonathan Saruk for International Medical Corps

nprglobalhealth:

How Midwives Have Become Critical In War Zones

In a conflict zone, getting the basics — food, water, shelter — is a constant challenge. And it likely involves being on the move.

Now imagine pregnancy. There might not be a functioning medical facility for miles. And the environment makes the woman and her baby more susceptible to complications.

Aid groups are increasingly relying on conflict midwives to help women in these situations. In dangerous and unstable regions, midwives’ jobs are more than delivering babies: They often have to help women who have experienced sexual violence and have reproductive health issues.

Take Emily Slocum, a midwife with Doctors Without Borders who worked with women affected by the violent conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Some women traveled days to reach her.

The Congo war lasted from 1998 to 2004, but as NPR’s John Burnett has reported, ongoing conflict continues to disrupt daily life. The country has millions of displaced people.

Slocum worked at a hospital in South Kivu, where the conflict still lingers, from November 2011 to May 2012. She tells Shots that one of the challenges was keeping underweight newborns warm. Without an incubator, the best practice is to have the mother hold the baby to her skinto keep its body temperature up, she says. She had to teach nurses and mothers to do that when she arrived

Continue reading.

Photograph by Jonathan Saruk for International Medical Corps

pubhealth:

npr:

Cyclo-What? A Nasty Stomach Bug Spreads In The Midwest
A rare parasite has sickened at least 315 people across 14 states, health officials said. The culprit is cyclospora, a food-borne bug that causes wicked diarrhea. People typically catch the parasite from contaminated vegetables, but the source of this outbreak is still unknown.
Read the story on NPR’s Shots health blog.
(Illustration: Centers for Disease Control)

Check CDC’s outbreak investigation status here:
Investigation of an Outbreak of Cyclosporiasis in the United States

pubhealth:

npr:

Cyclo-What? A Nasty Stomach Bug Spreads In The Midwest

A rare parasite has sickened at least 315 people across 14 states, health officials said. The culprit is cyclospora, a food-borne bug that causes wicked diarrhea. People typically catch the parasite from contaminated vegetables, but the source of this outbreak is still unknown.

Read the story on NPR’s Shots health blog.

(Illustration: Centers for Disease Control)

Check CDC’s outbreak investigation status here:

Investigation of an Outbreak of Cyclosporiasis in the United States

(via nprglobalhealth)

wildcat2030:

Meet the Bacteria That Might Save the World
Ralstonia eutropha can convert carbon dioxide into diesel fuel Scientists working with the United States Department of Energy and Joint BioEnergy Institute have demonstrated that the soil bacteria Ralstonia eutropha can be engineered to convert atmospheric carbon dioxide into diesel fuel. It might just help solve two of the biggest problems facing the world in one fell swoop: global warming due to greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide is the primary gas emitted by industrial pollution) and fuel lack causing by dwindling oil supplies. We earlier reported on Ultraculture that Ralstonia eutropha had been shown to convert carbon into biodegradable plastic as well as isobutanol alcohol, which can be used as a gasoline replacement—but the new development allows the direct creation of advanced biodiesel instead of simply alcohol. (via Ultraculture | Tools for a Better Future)

wildcat2030:

Meet the Bacteria That Might Save the World

Ralstonia eutropha can convert carbon dioxide into diesel fuel Scientists working with the United States Department of Energy and Joint BioEnergy Institute have demonstrated that the soil bacteria Ralstonia eutropha can be engineered to convert atmospheric carbon dioxide into diesel fuel. It might just help solve two of the biggest problems facing the world in one fell swoop: global warming due to greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide is the primary gas emitted by industrial pollution) and fuel lack causing by dwindling oil supplies. We earlier reported on Ultraculture that Ralstonia eutropha had been shown to convert carbon into biodegradable plastic as well as isobutanol alcohol, which can be used as a gasoline replacement—but the new development allows the direct creation of advanced biodiesel instead of simply alcohol. (via Ultraculture | Tools for a Better Future)

nprglobalhealth:

Triple Threat: Middle East Respiratory Virus And 2 Bird Flus
Is the world on the verge of a pandemic? There are three reasons to think so. Two flu viruses are active, and a virus that bears a resemblance to SARS has cropped up in the Middle East. Each has devastating potential, but many early warnings of past pandemics have failed to materialize.
The World Health Organization is warning health care workers everywhere to suspect a disease called Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, whenever they see a case of unexplained pneumonia.
Monday’s warning comes at the end of a six-day WHO investigation in Saudi Arabia, where 40 of the 55 cases of the respiratory disease have occurred. Sixty percent of those people with known infections died.
Meanwhile, recent reports in the journal Cell present evidence that two other worrisome viruses — H5N1 and H7N9 flu — may be on the verge of becoming more contagious in humans.
Continue reading.
In the photograph, men outside a hospital in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, wear surgical masks as a precaution against infection with a coronavirus. Photograph by Stringer/Reuters /Landov

nprglobalhealth:

Triple Threat: Middle East Respiratory Virus And 2 Bird Flus

Is the world on the verge of a pandemic? There are three reasons to think so. Two flu viruses are active, and a virus that bears a resemblance to SARS has cropped up in the Middle East. Each has devastating potential, but many early warnings of past pandemics have failed to materialize.

The World Health Organization is warning health care workers everywhere to suspect a disease called Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, whenever they see a case of unexplained pneumonia.

Monday’s warning comes at the end of a six-day WHO investigation in Saudi Arabia, where 40 of the 55 cases of the respiratory disease have occurred. Sixty percent of those people with known infections died.

Meanwhile, recent reports in the journal Cell present evidence that two other worrisome viruses — H5N1 and H7N9 flu — may be on the verge of becoming more contagious in humans.

Continue reading.

In the photograph, men outside a hospital in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, wear surgical masks as a precaution against infection with a coronavirus. Photograph by Stringer/Reuters /Landov